About CRI

Our Method

The CRI brings together academics and climate practitioners from government, non-profits and the private sector to work in four areas:

Climate Adaptation Research Projects

CRI conducts joint academic-stakeholder, inter-disciplinary research projects that inform Bay Area climate decision-making and produce new, groundbreaking knowledge.

Bay Area Climate Adaptation Extension Service

CRI uses workshops, webinars, and various media channels where academics and stakeholders work across disciplines and silos to problem-solve key issues, build the capacity of communities and institutions, and identify topics for in-depth study.

UC Global Initiative Support

CRI supports university-led global climate initiatives by packaging and presenting Bay Area climate success stories that will inspire and inform metro areas globally, and by bringing Bay Area academics and climate leaders together with their global peers for mutual learning and problem-solving.

21st Century Climate Leader Training

CRI provides in-depth climate education experiences for university students, community members, and Bay Area leaders

Our Mission

The Climate Readiness Institute develops 21st century climate adaptation solutions to build the Bay Area’s capacity for action, and creates knowledge to inform and inspire cities worldwide.

Who We Are

The CRI, headquartered at UC Berkeley, features experts from the region’s leading research institutions including climate science, civil engineering, urban planning, ecology, oceanography, and law. Public sector partners include natural resource managers, transportation planners, health departments, and representatives from local, regional, and state government. Leading business groups, community-based organizations, and science education stakeholders are key players in charting CRI’s direction. Working together, this diverse team is developing solutions to the Bay Area’s most pressing climate challenges that would not be possible by working alone, while creating new knowledge for cities worldwide.

Students in Research

The role of both undergraduate and graduate students is vital to the success of the CRI. Young people, having grown up under the specter of climate change, are called to action and eager to participate. The CRI provides a framework, as well as financial support, for students of involved faculty to participate in research that is local, hands-on, and relevant in real-time. They will affect change and shift policy.

CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS: SEA LEVEL RISE, HEAT WAVES, WATER/ENERGY SHORTAGES, WILDFIRES, ETC.

News & Events

CRI Webinar–June 2, 2016

Live Edge Adaptation Project (LEAP)

Presented by Nate Kauffman, UC Berkeley
Watch the video of this 1 hour webinar here

CRI Webinar

Engaging Communities in Effective Problem Solving
The Resilient Communities Initiative

Listen to the 1 Hour Recording – Presentation and Discussion (download video)

CRI Webinar

California @ the Paris Climate Talks (COP21)

The Under 2 MOU

Ken Alex, Governor’s Office of Planning and Research (download pdf)

Community Choice Aggregation

Tom Kelly, KyotoUSA
Shawn Marshall, LEAN Energy US (download pdf)
Dawn Weisz, Marin Clean Energy (download pdf)

CRI Roundtable

Creating a Climate-Smart Bay Area  Barrows Hall — U.C. Berkeley

CRI held its first funders roundtable on September 9th at The Matrix atop Barrows Hall on campus. The 1/2 day session featured presentations from pairs of academic-practitioner experts on each of CRI’s five focus areas. The presentations outlined key challenges, current CRI projects and potential CRI initiatives to help Bay Area practitioners move forward. For more information, please see the agenda and the complete presentation.

Creating a Climate-Smart Bay Area

Bill Collins, Director, CRI (download pdf)

Natural Systems

David Ackerly, Professor, Integrative Biology, UC Berkeley (download pdf)
Nadine Peterson, Deputy Director, California State Coastal Conservancy

Flooding/Sea Level Rise

Kristina Hill, Associate Professor, Landscape Architecture, Environmental Planning and Urban Design, UC Berkeley (download pdf)
Larry Goldzband, Executive Director, Bay Conservation and Development Commission

Water

David Sedlak, Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, UC Berkeley (download pdf)
Cordel Stillman, Deputy Chief Engineer, Sonoma County Water Agency

GHG Emissions

Andrew Jones, Climate Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (download pdf)
Abby Young, Climate Protection Manager, Bay Area Air Quality Management District

Health

Rachel Morello-Frosch, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy and Management, UC Berkeley (download pdf)
Sara T Mayer, Public Health Director, San Mateo County

The Scientific Consensus Statement and Governor Brown

Tony Barnosky, UC Berkeley (download pdf)

CRI’S FIRST RESEARCH PROJECTS!

Multi-Scale Infrastructure Interactions with Intermittent Disruptions: Coastal Flood Protection, Transportation and Governance Networks

Berkeley—Davis—USGS team led by Mark Stacey, UC Berkeley Civil and Environmental Engineering (download pdf)

Strategies for Adapting to Long-Term Sea Level Rise in the San Francisco Bay Area

Project led by Kristina Hill, UC Berkeley College of Environmental Design
(download pdf)

Bay Area Water in a Changing Climate

David Brower Center — Berkeley

The CRI hosted a half-day workshop for 115 Bay Area water stakeholders to discuss strategies for addressing the current drought and the longer term shifts in our water/climate world.

Agenda (download pdf)

Presentations

A Quick Primer on the California Drought — Bruce Riordan, CRI
(download pdf)

The Bay Area Water Future — William Collins, Berkeley Lab/CRI
(download pdf)

2050: The Year We Completed Our Urban Water Transformation — David Sedlak, UC Berkeley Water Center
(download pdf)

Handouts

Bay Area Drought Scorecard (download pdf)

California’s Water — Public Policy Institute of California

Participants (download pdf)

Meeting Action Summaries

Action Memo #1: Current Bay Area Drought Actions
(download pdf)

Action Memo #2: Proposed Actions
(download pdf)

Action Memo #3: Assistance Needed from the CRI
(download pdf)

Top Bay Area Drought & Water Web Sites
(download pdf)

A STRONG BAY AREA ECONOMY=MORE RESOURCES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE WORK.

Staff

Staff

William Collins, Director

UC Berkeley Professor, Senior Scientist, and Climate Sciences Department Chair at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), William Collins is a member of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) that is credited with sounding the alarm worldwide about climate change. He is also the chief scientist for the US Department of Energy’s advanced predictive earth system modeling initiative.

Andrew Jones, Deputy Director

Andrew Jones is a research scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A climate scientist with interdisciplinary expertise, Andrew’s research portfolio spans economics, ecology, and policy analysis in addition to earth system modeling. He is interested in how climate data is best used for impacts and adaptation assessment, how to understand and quantify climate uncertainty, and how decisions can be made in the face of that uncertainty. His past work has informed the various ways that biofuels and land use can help or hinder climate mitigation goals.

 

Bruce Riordan, Program Director

Bruce Riordan has been a consultant on climate change strategies in the Bay Area for the last 10 years. For the Joint Policy Committee, he developed and operated the Bay Area Climate & Energy Resilience Project, a learning network of 300+ Bay Area climate stakeholders from the public, private and non-profit sectors. He also founded the Alliance of Regional Collaboratives for Climate Adaptation (ARCCA) that brings together climate adaptation leaders from across California.

Maria Hjelm, Development Director

Maria Hjelm is the Math and Physical Science Development Director in the College of Letters & Science at the University of California, Berkeley. Previously, she oversaw development and communications for the Physics Department and has experience in launching various campus centers including the Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics and the Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics. Prior to coming to Berkeley, Maria spent over a decade in the field of book publishing.

WHAT ARE THE KEY ACTIONS IN A 10/20 YEAR PLAN TO BUILD A HEALTHY AND RESILIENT BAY AREA FOR ALL?

Working Groups

Working Groups

The CRI has organized five initial working groups, composed of academics and practitioners, to outline possible CRI projects for five key topics:

Flooding (sea level rise, storms, tides)

Support the expansion and replication of BCDC’s Adapting to Rising Tides and other on-the-ground projects that will advance local and regional planning. Conduct joint research projects on governance, financing, nature-based solutions and other critical topics.

Water

Co-produce knowledge and guidance on climate projections, the costs/benefits of various strategies, water equity, and other issues to support climate action by the Bay Area’s water agencies.

Health

Integrate health considerations into the mainstream of Bay Area climate planning for both greenhouse gas reduction and addressing climate impacts such as heat, drought, and food price increases. Conduct joint research projects that will create solutions for the Bay Area’s most vulnerable communities and populations.

 

Terrestrial Systems and Working Lands

Build greater understanding and awareness of the critical roles that Bay Area open space, parks and working lands can play in protecting the Bay Area’s quality of life and building a more resilient and prosperous region in a warmer world. Conduct research projects that demonstrate the value of rangelands and other ecosystems to greenhouse gas reduction, water conservation, and other climate issues.

GHG Reduction

Assist the Bay Area Air Quality Management District and its partners in developing the Regional Climate Protection Strategy, a roadmap for major GHG reductions in the Bay Area. Conduct research projects to determine which GHG strategies will make the greatest contribution to creating a low-carbon Bay Area.

For more information on the working groups, please contact Bruce Riordan at bruce@climatereadinessinstitute.org

GOVERNANCE: WHAT ARE THE BEST PLANNING IMPLEMENTATION ROLES FOR STATE, REGIONAL AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT PLAYERS?

Advisory Group

Advisory Group

Abby Young, Bay Area Air Quality Management District
Alex Zwissler, Chabot Space and Science Center
Allen Goldstein, UC Berkeley
Allison Brooks, Bay Area Joint Policy Committee
Amber Mace, UC Davis
Andrew Jones, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Andy Gunther, Bay Area Ecosystems Climate Change Consortium
Bruce Riordan, Bay Area Joint Policy Committee
Carl Anthony, Breakthrough Communities
Charles Long, Urban Land Institute
Cordel Stillman, Sonoma County Water Agency
David Ackerly, UC Berkeley
David Sedlak, UC Berkeley
John Largier, UC Davis
Kristina Hill, UC Berkeley
Larry Goldzband, Bay Conservation and Development Commission

 

Lauren Casey, Regional Climate Protection Authority (Sonoma County)
Linda Rudolph, Public Health Institute
Maria Hjelm, UC Berkeley
Mark Stacey, UC Berkeley
Maureen Martin, Contra Costa Water District
Noah Diffenbaugh, Stanford University
Paloma Pavel, Breakthrough Communities
Paul Ullrich, UC Davis
Robert Dickinson, Argos Analytics
Ron Cohen, UC Berkeley
Salote Soqo, Environmental Justice Coalition for Water
Sandi Galvez, Bay Area Regional Health Inequities Initiative
Steve Weissman, Berkeley Law
Timothy Burroughs, City of Berkeley
Torri Estrada, Environmental Justice Coalition for Water
William Collins, UC Berkeley/ Lawrence Berkeley Lab
Zack Wasserman, Bay Conservation and Development Commission

COST AND FINANCE: WHAT MECHANISMS COULD BE PUT IN PLACE IN THE BAY AREA TO FUND ADAPTATION STRATEGIES?

Contact

Contact Us

For more information:
Bruce Riordan
510.665.4357
bruce@climatereadinessinstitute.org

Maria Hjelm
510.642.5979
climatereadiness@berkeley.edu

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